Fuduntu 2013.1 Released With Netflix, Steam And E17 Support, New Default Dock

Fuduntu 2013.1Fuduntu 2013.1 has been released today, bringing Netflix, Steam and E17 stable support, along with Jockey for proprietary video driver installation and other changes and updates.
Fuduntu is a Linux distribution forked from Fedora that uses GNOME 2 by default, which provides rolling updated for non-GNOME2 packages so you get the latest updates for applications such as VLC, Chromium, Firefox and so on while using a stable desktop.

Fuduntu SteamSteam for Linux running in Fuduntu

The latest Fuduntu 2013.1 features support for Netflix (it’s the Netflix Desktop app that uses Wine, about which we’ve talked about a while back), Steam beta (but obviously, this isn’t supported by the Steam developers) and E17 so to install them, simple use yum and install “steam”, “netflix-desktop” or “fuduntu-enlightenment” packages.

Fuduntu Cairo Dock
Another change in Fuduntu 2013.1 is the replacement of the default task switcher / dock: instead of Avant Window Navigator (which is no longer maintained), Fuduntu now uses Cairo Dock, with a beautiful theme that looks pretty much the same as the AWN theme used previously. Cairo Dock is highly configurable and comes with many applets and themes by default.
Those who upgrade to the latest Fuduntu instead of a fresh install, will get Cairo Dock but it will not be enabled by default – to enable it, go to System > Preferences > Bottom Panel Chooser and select Dock.
The new version also features Jockey for installing proprietary video drivers and DuckDuckGo.com is now used as the default search engine in Fuduntu. Also, Jupiter, the once popular power management applet, has been removed from the default installation because, as you probably know, its development stopped.
Other updates included in Fuduntu 2013.1:
Kernel 3.6.9Gimp 2.8.2Thunderbird 17.0Firefox 17.0 (not installed by default)Chromium 23.0.1271.97VLC 2.0.5Xorg 1.12WINE 1.5.18 (not installed by default)QEMU 1.0.1 (not installed by default)

Download Fuduntu

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



Category: Ubuntu | Comments Off on Fuduntu 2013.1 Released With Netflix, Steam And E17 Support, New Default Dock

Fuduntu 2013.1 Released With Netflix, Steam And E17 Support, New Default Dock

Fuduntu 2013.1Fuduntu 2013.1 has been released today, bringing Netflix, Steam and E17 stable support, along with Jockey for proprietary video driver installation and other changes and updates.
Fuduntu is a Linux distribution forked from Fedora that uses GNOME 2 by default, which provides rolling updated for non-GNOME2 packages so you get the latest updates for applications such as VLC, Chromium, Firefox and so on while using a stable desktop.

Fuduntu SteamSteam for Linux running in Fuduntu

The latest Fuduntu 2013.1 features support for Netflix (it’s the Netflix Desktop app that uses Wine, about which we’ve talked about a while back), Steam beta (but obviously, this isn’t supported by the Steam developers) and E17 so to install them, simple use yum and install “steam”, “netflix-desktop” or “fuduntu-enlightenment” packages.

Fuduntu Cairo Dock
Another change in Fuduntu 2013.1 is the replacement of the default task switcher / dock: instead of Avant Window Navigator (which is no longer maintained and doesn’t build with the latest glib), Fuduntu now uses Cairo Dock, with a beautiful theme that looks pretty much the same as the AWN theme used previously. Cairo Dock is highly configurable and comes with many applets and themes by default.
Those who upgrade to the latest Fuduntu instead of a fresh install, will get Cairo Dock but it will not be enabled by default – to enable it, go to System > Preferences > Bottom Panel Chooser and select Dock.
The new version also features Jockey for installing proprietary video drivers and DuckDuckGo.com is now used as the default search engine in Fuduntu. Also, Jupiter, the once popular power management applet, has been removed from the default installation because, as you probably know, its development stopped and most of its features are now available in the Linux Kernel anyway..
Other updates included in Fuduntu 2013.1:
Kernel 3.6.9Gimp 2.8.2Thunderbird 17.0Firefox 17.0 (not installed by default)Chromium 23.0.1271.97VLC 2.0.5Xorg 1.12WINE 1.5.18 (not installed by default)QEMU 1.0.1 (not installed by default)

Download Fuduntu

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



Category: Ubuntu | Comments Off on Fuduntu 2013.1 Released With Netflix, Steam And E17 Support, New Default Dock

Fuduntu 2012.4 Released With New Default Applications And Theme

Fuduntu, a Linux distribution forked from Fedora, has reached version 2012.4. This release brings a new default theme and wallpaper, new default packages and many other improvements.

fuduntu


Changes in Fuduntu 2012.4:

  • new default applications: LibreOffice, GIMP, Thunderbird and also, VLC has replaced Banshee as the default music and video player
  • optimized TMPFS mount points to reduce disk I/O, increasing speed and battery life
  • a new welcome screen “Elmer”
  • new default theme and wallpaper (along with new preinstalled wallpapers)
  • package updates: Linux Kernel 3.4.10, Chromium 21.0.1180.89, Thunderbird 15, LibreOffice 3.6.1.2, GIMP 2.8.2. Jupiter has been updated to 0.1.6, allowing for restore on resume from standby and updates to power management (tip: Jupiter is also available in a PPA for Ubuntu users)

fuduntu

Besides the changes above, it’s also worth mentioning that starting with version 2012.4, Fuduntu is now Mono-free.

    Further more, a memory bug has been fixed and now Fuduntu can be installed on systems with only 386MB of RAM for 32bit and 512MB RAM for 64bit.
    For those not familiar with Fuduntu, this is a Linux distribution that was initially based on Fedora, that uses GNOME 2 by default, which provides rolling updates for non-GNOME2 packages, so you always have the latest version for various packages like Firefox or Chromium, VLC, LibreOffice and so on. It uses a GNOME panel on the top, Avant Window Navigator as the taskbar and comes with many under-the-hood optimizations intended to make the system very fast and to increase battery life.
    If you’re wondering about the name, “Fuduntu” is a fusion of the names “Fedora” and “Ubuntu”. The name is intended to be “funny, while implying that the distribution fits in-between Fedora and Ubuntu. The fun uses of the name mean that it is successful, so go ahead, have fun with it” says the Fuduntu wiki.

    Category: Ubuntu | Comments Off on Fuduntu 2012.4 Released With New Default Applications And Theme

    Failover and Load Balancing using HAProxy

    HAProxy is open source proxy that can be used to enable high availability and load balancing for web applications. It was designed especially for high load projects so it is very fast and predictable, HAProxy is based on single-process model.

    In this post I’ll describe sample setup of HAProxy: users’ requests are load balanced between two web servers Web1 and Web1, if one of them goes down then all the request are processed by alive server, once dead servers recovers load balancing enables again. See topology to the right.
    HAProxy sample topology

    Installation

    HAProxy is included into repositories for major Linux distributions, so if you’re using Centos, Redhat or Fedora type the following command:

    yum install haproxy

    If you’re Ubuntu, Debian or Linux Mint user use this one instead:

    apt-get install haproxy

    Configuration

    As soon as HAProxy is installed it’s time to edit its configuration file, usually it’s placed in /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg. Official documentation for HAProxy 1.4 (stable) is here.

    Here is configuration file to implement setup shown at the diagram and described above:

    global
    user daemon
    group daemon
    daemon
    log 127.0.0.1 daemon

    Category: Linux | Comments Off on Failover and Load Balancing using HAProxy

    Grub Fallback: Boot good kernel if new one crashes

    It’s hard to believe but I didn’t know about Grub fallback feature. So every time when I needed to reboot remote server into a new kernel I had to test it on local server to make sure it won’t panic on remote unit. And if kernel panic still happened I had to ask somebody who has physical access to the server to reboot the hardware choose proper kernel in Grub. It’s all boring and not healthful – it’s much better to use Grub’s native fallback feature.

    Grub is default boot loader in most Linux distributions today, at least major distros like Centos/Fedora/RedHat, Debian/Ubuntu/Mint, Arch use Grub. This makes it possible to use Grub fallback feature just out of the box. Here is example scenario.

    There is remote server hosted in New Zealand and you (sitting in Denmark) have access to it over the network only (no console server). In this case you cannot afford that the new kernel makes server unreachable, e.g. if new kernel crash during boot it won’t load network interface drivers so your Linux box won’t appear online until somebody reboots it into workable kernel. Thankfully Grub can be configured to try loading new kernel once and if it fails Grub will load another kernel according to configuration. You can see my example grub.conf below:

    default=saved
    timeout=5
    splashimage=(hd0,1)/boot/grub/splash.xpm.gz
    hiddenmenu
    fallback 0 1
    title Fedora OpenVZ (2.6.32-042stab053.5)
    root (hd0,1)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-042stab053.5 ro root=UUID=6fbdddf9-307c-49eb-83f5-ca1a4a63f584 rd_MD_UUID=1b9dc11a:d5a084b5:83f6d993:3366bbe4 rd_NO_LUKS rd_NO_LVM rd_NO_DM LANG=en_US.UTF-8 SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 KEYTABLE=sv-latin1 rhgb quiet crashkernel=auto
    initrd /boot/initramfs-2.6.32-042stab053.5.img
    savedefault fallback
    title Fedora (2.6.35.12-88.fc14.i686)
    root (hd0,1)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.35.12-88.fc14.i686 ro root=UUID=6fbdddf9-307c-49eb-83f5-ca1a4a63f584 rd_MD_UUID=1b9dc11a:d5a084b5:83f6d993:3366bbe4 rd_NO_LUKS rd_NO_LVM rd_NO_DM LANG=en_US.UTF-8 SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 KEYTABLE=sv-latin1 rhgb quiet
    initrd /boot/initramfs-2.6.35.12-88.fc14.i686.img
    savedefault fallback

    According to this configuration Grub will try to load ‘Fedora OpenVZ’ kernel once and if it fails system will be loaded into good ‘Fedora’ kernel. If ‘Fedora OpenVZ’ loads well you’ll be able to reach the server over the network after reboot. Notice lines ‘default=saved’ and ‘savedefault fallback’ which are mandatory to make fallback feature working.

    Alternative way

    I’ve heard that official Grub fallback feature may work incorrectly on RHEL5 (and Centos 5) so there is elegant workaround (found here):

    1. Add param ‘panic=5′ to your new kernel line so it looks like below:

    title Fedora OpenVZ (2.6.32-042stab053.5)
    root (hd0,1)
    kernel /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-042stab053.5 ro root=UUID=6fbdddf9-307c-49eb-83f5-ca1a4a63f584 rd_MD_UUID=1b9dc11a:d5a084b5:83f6d993:3366bbe4 rd_NO_LUKS rd_NO_LVM rd_NO_DM LANG=en_US.UTF-8 SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 KEYTABLE=sv-latin1 rhgb quiet crashkernel=auto panic=5
    initrd /boot/initramfs-2.6.32-042stab053.5.img

    This param will make crashed kernel to reboot itself in 5 seconds.

    2. Point default Grub param to good kernel, e.g. ‘default=0′.

    3. Type in the following commands (good kernel appears in grub.conf first and new kernel is second one):

    # grub

    Category: Linux | Comments Off on Grub Fallback: Boot good kernel if new one crashes

    Change the Keyboard Layout in Fedora 15 {LoveLock}

    Fedroa 15 was released a while back and as much as it has shown some tremendous improvements, I fail to understand why should it be rocket science to do something as simple as changing the keyboard layout. With Gnome 3 making Fedora 15 shine, it should be easier to just type “keyboard layout” in the search box to come to the screen for changing the layout of keyboard. However that is not the case. So in order to change the keyboard layout (different language keyboard layout) follow the steps below:

    Note: The keyboard setting under Activities > Applications > System Settings > Keyboard doesnt have the option to change the keyboard layout.

    Go to:

    Activities > Applications > System Settings >  Region and language and click the Layout tab.

    Click the + buttonto add a keyboard layout.

    Play around with rest of the settings.

    Category: Linux, Ubuntu | Comments Off on Change the Keyboard Layout in Fedora 15 {LoveLock}