Fix Facebook Not Working With Gwibber In Ubuntu 12.10 Or 12.04

Facebook doesn’t currently work with Gwibber (the Facebook feeds aren’t updated – bug HERE) and this bug affects Ubuntu 12.10, 12.04 and probably older Ubuntu versions as well.

Update: This bug also affected Ubuntu 13.04 (currently under development), but a fix was pushed a few minutes after publishing this post. Hopefully the fix will make it into older Ubuntu versions soon.
There is, however, a work-around which I can confirm it works for Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal and 12.04 Precise Pangolin – so here’s how to apply it and get Facebook to work with Gwibber again!

gwibber facebook working

1. Open /usr/share/gwibber/plugins/facebook/__init__.py as root with a text editor – we’ll use Gedit so to open the file, run the following command in a terminal:
gksu gedit /usr/share/gwibber/plugins/facebook/__init__.py
2. In the newly opened file, search for the following code:

m[“privacy”][“description”] = data[“privacy”][“description”]
It should be on line 329 for Ubuntu 12.10 (with Gwibber 3.6.0-0ubuntu1) and on line 210 for Ubuntu 12.04. The line number may be different on other Gwibber / Ubuntu versions.
And replace that line with the following code:
if data[“privacy”].has_key(“description”):
m[“privacy”][“description”] = data[“privacy”][“description”]
else:
m[“privacy”][“description”] = “Unknown”Make sure the code is pasted exactly as it’s displayed above, including the spaces in the beginning, or else it won’t work!
Then, save the file. Here’s how the file should look after editing it:

gwibber facebook fix

3. Restart Gwibber Service:
killall gwibber-service
gwibber-service &Then close Gwibber if it was running, start it again and Facebook feeds should now update in Gwibber under Ubuntu 12.10 or 12.04.

Thanks to Ruben Rocha for the tip and Vinu Joseph (jvinu22) for the fix!

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



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Ubuntu: LightDM Black Screen When Using SSD Workaround

Some Ubuntu users are reporting LightDM errors when using a SDD: about half the time when starting the computer, LightDM (the default Ubuntu display manager) doesn’t load correctly and only a black screen and a blinking command line cursor shows up. The issue isn’t limited to those who are using a SSD, but it’s a lot more frequent when booting Ubuntu from a solid-state drive.
I too am experiencing this issue with Ubuntu 12.10 (not tested on older Ubuntu versions because I didn’t have a SSD when I was using 12.04) and I’ve found two possible workarounds which have worked for me so I thought I’d share them with you, in case you’re experiencing the same issue.

It seems that the black screen with only a blinking cursor (though sometimes I’ve also seen the “System is running in low-graphics mode” error) issue occurs due to a race condition with LightDM and without any tweaks, the only way to load the desktop was to either switch to a tty (CTRL + ALT + F1), login and then restart Lightdm using the “sudo service lightdm restart” command or restart the computer. So here are two possible workarounds:

1. Start LightDM with a delay

LightDM
One way around this is to start LightDM with a delay. My system, with Ubuntu 12.10 64bit installed on a SSD boots in ~14 seconds so adding a delay isn’t ideal, but it’s definitely better than having to manually start LightDM or restart the computer. For me, a 2 seconds delay was enough so it’s not that bad, however, some users have reported that a higher delay was required for them, so it depends on your system and SSD.
I must also mention that from what I’ve read, this workaround doesn’t always work, meaning that if before using it, LightDM wouldn’t start 50% of the time, using this workaround doesn’t necessary mean it will work 100% of the time. Since I’ve applied this tweak, LightDM has worked every time for me so this probably depends on the hardware / SSD and how fast the system boots.
To start LightDM with a delay, edit the /etc/init/lightdm.conf file as root with a text editor (I’ll be using Gedit below):gksu gedit /etc/init/lightdm.conf
And near the end of the file (line 47 for me under Ubuntu 12.10 with LightDM 1.4.0-0ubuntu2), above “exec lightdm”, add the following line and then save the file: sleep 2
“2” is the number of seconds used to delay starting LightDM. Like I was saying above, “2” was enough for me, but depending on your system, you might need to add a higher value.
This is how the end of the /etc/init/lightdm.conf file should look like after editing it:

lightdm.conf delay

2. Use GDM instead of LightDM

GDM
The issue did not occur for me while using GDM and booting Ubuntu from a SSD, so if you don’t want to add a delay to LightDM, you can install and use GDM instead.
To install GDM in Ubuntu, use the following command:
sudo apt-get install gdm
Or install it via Synaptic, Software Center, etc.

When installing GDM, you’ll be prompted to select the display manager: here, select GDM instead of LightDM.
If GDM was already installed but you were using LightDM, you can switch to GDM by using the following command:sudo dpkg-reconfigure gdm
And then select GDM when prompted.

More about switching between LightDM, GDM, etc. in Ubuntu, HERE.

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



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Ubuntu: LightDM Black Screen When Using SSD Workaround

Some Ubuntu users are reporting LightDM errors when using a SDD: about half the time when starting the computer, LightDM (the default Ubuntu display manager) doesn’t load correctly and only a black screen and a blinking command line cursor shows up. The issue isn’t limited to those who are using a SSD, but it’s a lot more frequent when booting Ubuntu from a solid-state drive.
I too am experiencing this issue with Ubuntu 12.10 (not tested on older Ubuntu versions because I didn’t have a SSD when I was using 12.04) and I’ve found two possible workarounds which have worked for me so I thought I’d share them with you, in case you’re experiencing the same issue.

It seems that the black screen with only a blinking cursor (though sometimes I’ve also seen the “System is running in low-graphics mode” error) issue occurs due to a race condition with LightDM and without any tweaks, the only way to load the desktop was to either switch to a tty (CTRL + ALT + F1), login and then restart Lightdm using the “sudo service lightdm restart” command or restart the computer. So here are two possible workarounds:

1. Start LightDM with a delay

LightDM
One way around this is to start LightDM with a delay. My system, with Ubuntu 12.10 64bit installed on a SSD boots in ~14 seconds so adding a delay isn’t ideal, but it’s definitely better than having to manually start LightDM or restart the computer. For me, a 2 seconds delay was enough so it’s not that bad, however, some users have reported that a higher delay was required for them, so it depends on your system and SSD.
I must also mention that from what I’ve read, this workaround doesn’t always work, meaning that if before using it, LightDM wouldn’t start 50% of the time, using this workaround doesn’t necessary mean it will work 100% of the time. Since I’ve applied this tweak, LightDM has worked every time for me so this probably depends on the hardware / SSD and how fast the system boots.
To start LightDM with a delay, edit the /etc/init/lightdm.conf file as root with a text editor (I’ll be using Gedit below):gksu gedit /etc/init/lightdm.conf
And near the end of the file (line 47 for me under Ubuntu 12.10 with LightDM 1.4.0-0ubuntu2), above “exec lightdm”, add the following line and then save the file: sleep 2
“2” is the number of seconds used to delay starting LightDM. Like I was saying above, “2” was enough for me, but depending on your system, you might need to add a higher value.
This is how the end of the /etc/init/lightdm.conf file should look like after editing it:

lightdm.conf delay

2. Use GDM instead of LightDM

GDM
The issue did not occur for me while using GDM and booting Ubuntu from a SSD, so if you don’t want to add a delay to LightDM, you can install and use GDM instead.
To install GDM in Ubuntu, use the following command:
sudo apt-get install gdm
Or install it via Synaptic, Software Center, etc.

When installing GDM, you’ll be prompted to select the display manager: here, select GDM instead of LightDM.
If GDM was already installed but you were using LightDM, you can switch to GDM by using the following command:sudo dpkg-reconfigure gdm
And then select GDM when prompted.

More about switching between LightDM, GDM, etc. in Ubuntu, HERE.

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



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Ubuntu: LightDM Black Screen When Using SSD Workaround

Some Ubuntu users are reporting LightDM errors when using a SSD: about half the time when starting the computer, LightDM (the default Ubuntu display manager) doesn’t load correctly and only a black screen and a blinking command line cursor shows up. The issue isn’t limited to those who are using a SSD, but it’s a lot more frequent when booting Ubuntu from a solid-state drive.
I too am experiencing this issue with Ubuntu 12.10 (not tested on older Ubuntu versions because I didn’t have a SSD when I was using 12.04) and I’ve found two possible workarounds which have worked for me so I thought I’d share them with you, in case you’re experiencing the same issue.

It seems that the black screen with only a blinking cursor (though sometimes I’ve also seen the “System is running in low-graphics mode” error) issue occurs due to a race condition with LightDM and without any tweaks, the only way to load the desktop was to either switch to a tty (CTRL + ALT + F1), login and then restart Lightdm using the “sudo service lightdm restart” command or restart the computer. So here are two possible workarounds:

1. Start LightDM with a delay

LightDM
One way around this is to start LightDM with a delay. My system, with Ubuntu 12.10 64bit installed on a SSD boots in ~14 seconds so adding a 2 second delay isn’t much, however, for some, a larger delay might be needed (it depends on the system / SSD). This isn’t ideal but it’s definitely better than having to manually start LightDM or restart the computer.
I must also mention that from what I’ve read, this workaround doesn’t always work, meaning that if before using it, LightDM wouldn’t start 50% of the time, using this workaround doesn’t necessary mean it will work 100% of the time. Since I’ve applied this tweak, LightDM has worked every time for me so this probably depends on the hardware / SSD and how fast the system boots.
To start LightDM with a delay, edit the /etc/init/lightdm.conf file as root with a text editor (I’ll be using Gedit below):gksu gedit /etc/init/lightdm.conf
And near the end of the file (line 47 for me under Ubuntu 12.10 with LightDM 1.4.0-0ubuntu2), above “exec lightdm”, add the following line and then save the file: sleep 2
“2” is the number of seconds used to delay starting LightDM. Like I was saying above, “2” was enough for me, but depending on your system, you might need to add a higher value.
This is how the end of the /etc/init/lightdm.conf file should look like after editing it:

lightdm.conf delay

2. Use GDM instead of LightDM

GDM
The issue did not occur for me while using GDM and booting Ubuntu from a SSD, so if you don’t want to add a delay to LightDM, you can install and use GDM instead.
To install GDM in Ubuntu, use the following command:
sudo apt-get install gdm
Or install it via Synaptic, Software Center, etc.

When installing GDM, you’ll be prompted to select the display manager: here, select GDM instead of LightDM.
If GDM was already installed but you were using LightDM, you can switch to GDM by using the following command:sudo dpkg-reconfigure gdm
And then select GDM when prompted.

More about switching between LightDM, GDM, etc. in Ubuntu, HERE.

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



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Download Google Earth 7 With Fixed "Signal 11" Issue For Ubuntu

Google Earth 7 was released more than a month ago, however, the new version doesn’t work for most Linux users. Here’s how to run Google Earth 7 on Ubuntu right now.
Google Earth 7 (7.0.1) features new 3D imagery and a virtual tour guide which highlights interesting places around the world. You can read the official release notes, here.
Unfortunately, many Linux users get the following error when trying to start the latest Google Earth 7:
Google Earth has caught signal 11.
Google Earth signal 11 Linux
And the crash log looks something like this:

[…]
Stacktrace from glibc:
./libgoogleearth_free.so(+0x1e9cfb)[0xf75c1cfb]
./libgoogleearth_free.so(+0x1e9f43)[0xf75c1f43]
[0xf777a400]
One of the Google Earth developers has emailed fixed Google Earth builds (pre-release) to some Linux users who have commented about this issue on the Google Earth forums, and it seems a fixed build will be available soon (the exact date is not known) on the Google Earth download page.
Google Earth 7.0.1.8283 UbuntuGoogle Earth 7 (7.0.1.8283) running in Ubuntu 12.10
If you don’t want to wait, you can download these fixed Google Earth 7.0.1 builds (deb) for Ubuntu / Linux Mint / Debian below:32bit: google-earth-stable_7.0.1.8283-r0_i386.deb64bit: google-earth-stable_7.0.1.8283-r0_amd64.deb
Besides the “Google Earth has caught signal 11” issue, it seems that the font issue that used to occur for the Google Earth Linux builds has been fixed as well in these new packages.
Unfortunately, I couldn’t find any rpm files for this new 7.0.1.8283 build.

I will update this post when the Google Earth download page is updated with these fixed builds.

via productforums.google.com

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



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How To Find Out To Which PPA Repository A Package Belongs To

There are various reasons why you may need to find out to which PPA a package belongs to, for instance, in case a package in a PPA breaks something on your system, if you want to install a package which is already installed on your computer on some other machine but you don’t know the PPA you’ve used to install it and so on.

So here’s a quick tip on how to find out to which PPA a package belongs to.

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Xfce: Sync To VBlank Support For The Xfwm Compositor [PPA For Ubuntu 12.10]

If you’re experiencing screen tearing in Xfce 4.10, you’ll be glad to know there’s a patch that fixes this, which you can install right away.
The patch adds Sync to VBlank support to the Xfwm compositor and while it’s not perfect, it should fix most of the tearing on computers using Intel GPUs (might work with AMD as well). Here are the pros and cons of using this patch, according to the bug report where the patch was submitted:
Pros:
No tearing when dragging windowsNo tearing when resizing windowsNo tearing when using the flash plugin in firefoxNo tearing in windowed OpenGL applicationsUses less resources since the fps is limited to the display refresh rate
Cons:
Tested only using Intel gpu, but might also work with AMD. It doesn’t work with NvidiaBlocks xfwm’s main loop while waiting on the vertical blankTearing still happens about 10 pixels below the top of the display but since this space is usually only occupied by the title bar, it’s only visible when dragging a window across the drop of the screen

There’s also a small bug and enabling sync to vblank from the GUI doesn’t work, but this can easily be done with a single command.
I don’t experience any screen tearing in Xfce so I couldn’t properly test this, but the patch has been tested by WebUpd8 reader Johann Todorovic on a Dell Inspiron Laptop with Intel i5-2410M CPU and 4 GB of RAM running Ubuntu 12.10, and he confirms that it works, just as described in the bug report (see info above):
With the default Xfwm4 and the compositor on, I play 3 videos (avi and mp4) in Parole. All of them with permanent horizontal screen tearing. The same issue with flash videos in Youtube. With the default Xfwm4 and the compositor off, the tearing is even worse.

Then, i download and install your Xfwm4 patched deb. And enable the Vsync […].

After restarting the wm, with the compositor “on”, I performed the test with the same videos, and the reproduction is practically perfect! Tearing of video and flash reproduction, in full screen is almost imperceptible, and limited to the top of the screen “about 10 pixels below the top of the display”.

[…] I’m very glad with the results, the patch works and it’s a good improvement!

Install Xfwm4 with patch for compositor Vsync support
To install Xfwm4 with the patch for vsync support in Ubuntu 12.10, use the following commands:sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/experiments
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
If you’re using Ubuntu 12.04 with Xfce 4.10 or some other Debian-based Linux distribution, you can download the debs below (not tested):32bit64bit
Once installed, log out, then log back in and enable sync to vblank using the following command (remember, setting this from the UI doesn’t work):xfconf-query -c xfwm4 -p “/general/sync_to_vblank” -s true
For other Linux distributions, you can get the patch via Xfce Bugzilla.

Thanks to Johann Todorovic for the tip!

Originally published at WebUpd8: Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application reviews.



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